Musa ingens 5 seeds

15,95

Musa ingens 5 seeds

15,95

Few other plants are as ardently sought after as this enigmatic giant banana from the rugged and mysterious mountains of New Guinea. With a trunk up to at least 15 m tall, about a meter in diamater at the base and a total plant height of 20 m or more, it is the undisputed record holder for the largest and tallest of bananas and the largest non-woody plant in the world. It is certainly one of nature’s wonders how an herbaceous plant that grows from an underground rhizome and produces a pseudostem consisting solely of densely packed leaf-beass can reach a size larger than many woody trees. The pseudostem of Musa ingens is somewhat swollen toward the base and covered with a whitish waxy layer, somewhat reminiscent of Ensete glaucum, just a lot larger. It holds a crown of about 12 rather stiff, ascending leaves up to 6 m long. The large inflorescence can contain more than 300 oblong fruits up to 18 cm long that are filled with black-brown seeds and yellowish pulp that is edible, sweet and delicious when cooked and reminiscent of fine butternut squash mixed with a sweet banana with a dash of tangy lime and citrus added. Musa ingens is native to montane rain forests throughout New Guinea between about 1300 and 2000 m elevation and usually found in wet places in steep canyons or at the edges of upland marshes. Few seeds ever made it into cultivation in the past and most perished before their time because they were mishandled or picked immature. Our collectors are understandably quite proud of their amazing achievement. In cultivation, Musa ingens requires conditions appropriate to tree ferns rather than ordinary bananas. Because of its upland habitat, like many Ensete, it will not grow in tropical lowland climates, but only succeed at some altitudes where nights are cooler, or in oceanic, warm temperate climates such as Portugal, northern New Zealand, coastal California, coastal southern Brazil or on Atlantic islands such as Madeira or the Canary Islands.
have a reputation for being rather difficult to germinate.
Germination is probably most successful in conditions similar to those in their natural habitat. In the case of Musa ingens, it is humid, with hot days and cool nights. However, bananas do not germinate on the forest floor under a closed canopy. They cannot grow in deep shade. They are opportunistic plants with seeds that can lie in the ground for many years until a rare event brings down a canopy tree and allows light to reach the forest floor. Often fires can cause such damage. Then direct sunlight can reach the soil where the seeds are buried. To simulate these conditions, germination inhibitors likely in the
seeds sit to break down and activate germination, we expose them to 1. Heat, by pouring a small amount of boiling water over the seeds and letting them soak for 24 hours, then plant them shallowly and place the pots on a heat mat. 2. Smoke, by sprinkling ash on top of the soil and watering a few times with ash water, or alternatively treating them with smoke extract. 3. Light, by placing them under strong artificial light or filtered sunlight.
If done properly, these treatments can quickly induce germination at a high rate.

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Description

Few other plants are as ardently sought after as this enigmatic giant banana from the rugged and mysterious mountains of New Guinea. With a trunk at least 15 m tall, about a meter in diamater at the base and a total plant height of 20 m or more, it is the undisputed record holder for the largest and tallest of bananas and the largest non-woody plant in the world. It is certainly one of nature’s wonders how an herbaceous plant that grows from an underground rhizome and produces a pseudostem consisting solely of densely packed leaf-beass can reach a size larger than many woody trees. The pseudostem of Musa ingens is somewhat swollen toward the base and covered with a whitish waxy layer, somewhat reminiscent of Ensete glaucum, just a lot larger. It holds a crown of about 12 rather stiff, ascending leaves up to 6 m long. The large inflorescence can contain over 300 oblong fruits up to 18 cm long that are filled with black-brown seeds and yellowish pulp that is edible, sweet and delicious when cooked and reminiscent of fine butternut squash mixed with a sweet banana with a dash of tangy lime and citrus added. Musa ingens is native to montane rain forests throughout New Guinea between about 1300 and 2000 m elevation and usually found in wet places in steep canyons or at the edges of upland marshes. Few seeds ever made it into cultivation in the past, and most perished before their time because they were mishandled or picked immature. Our collectors are understandably quite proud of their amazing achievement. In cultivation, Musa ingens requires conditions appropriate to tree ferns rather than ordinary bananas. Because of its upland habitat, like many Ensete, it will not grow in tropical lowland climates, but only succeed at some altitudes where nights are cooler, or in oceanic, warm temperate climates such as Portugal, northern New Zealand, coastal California, coastal southern Brazil or on Atlantic islands such as Madeira or the Canary Islands.
have a reputation for being rather difficult to germinate.
Germination is probably most successful in conditions similar to those in their natural habitat. In the case of Musa ingens, it is humid, with hot days and cool nights. However, bananas do not germinate on the forest floor under a closed canopy. They cannot grow in deep shade. They are opportunistic plants with seeds that can lie in the ground for many years until a rare event brings down a canopy tree and allows light to reach the forest floor. Often fires can cause such damage. Then direct sunlight can reach the soil where the seeds are buried. To simulate these conditions, germination inhibitors likely in the
seeds sit to break down and activate germination, we expose them to 1. Heat, by pouring a small amount of boiling water over the seeds and letting them soak for 24 hours, then plant them shallowly and place the pots on a heat mat. 2. Smoke, by sprinkling ash on top of the soil and watering a few times with ash water, or alternatively treating them with smoke extract. 3. Light, by placing them under strong artificial light or filtered sunlight.
If done properly, these treatments can quickly induce germination at a high rate.

Additional information

Weight 0,0200 kg
Delen